Sunday, February 7, 2016

Feb. 1 - Feb. 5, The Week in Patterning - 7

The 1920 coat pattern is coming along in muslin. The current studies investigate the ease all around the coat that goes under the belt and how the fur collar will be attached to the coat. When the coat (originally referred to as a 'Simple Jacket') is finished, the belt is buttoned in place at front left and right sides. The belt neatly conceals the dart which shapes the waistline (which one notices in the pattern screenshot here, and as sewn in the muslin).

One will also note that the model shown in the art is much longer than the pattern I drafted and this first muslin iteration. The original instructions advise to add 25cm additional length once the pattern has been drafted from the master. I will add this additional length (10 inches) to the digital pattern once I am through all of the muslin details.
This muslin is for ensuring all pieces fit well together, to aid when I sketch construction details for the instructions I will provide with the finished pattern (hence, only one sleeve in place for these photos) and to verify the original pattern size.



Of course, this is not everything that has been happening in my pattern studio this week! I am through testing cut out details across sizes on my next multi-size pattern, the 1947 dress by Butterick. It is scheduled for issue shortly after Valentine's, so more on that in next weekend's post.

Saturday, January 30, 2016

Jan. 25 - Jan. 29, The Week in Patterning - 6

This and (a few following) storyboard(s) will allow you to watch the 1920 coat pattern come to life. At top, you recall this image of the master sheet from which I drafted each coat piece. Anytime I have an antique original master sheet, I run a large-format copy of it so as not to damage the original. I use colored pencils to locate each pattern piece in order to draft it to trace paper and then add seam allowances.
Below the master image, you see each traced piece with seam allowances added superimposed on each piece's location in the master, respectively. The opaque piece at right is the first iteration of the sleeve cuff, printed on the translucent bond paper I use when printing my patterns.

These images depict a Rowan knitting project I completed to go with one of my 'new' vintage makes, It is just the low-backed slip from the Vogue evening ensemble pattern 371 which lends itself so well to Rowan's 'Cobweb' shrug. I admire how Rowan promotes the use of such vintage styles as the 'framework' for their knitted and crocheted patterns-particularly in book 40 from which I knitted the shrug. In my favorite claret color, it is perfect for Valentine's Day!

This image, copyright Rowan:


Don't forget, EvaDress Patterns is sponsoring the Red Dress Contest at PatternReview.com. First place will be awarded a $100 non-expiring EvaDress Pattern gift certificate and the second place will receive a $50 certificate. It kicks off tomorrow (Monday, Feb. 1, 2016)!

Sunday, January 24, 2016

Jan. 18 - Jan. 22, The Week in Patterning - 5

I have a few of the 'new' vintage patterns posted for sale here! They are in good sizes ranging from 34 to 42 bust. I have counted them all up and checked the condition of each, So my work will soon begin to add about six patterns (two of which shown in last week's board) to my multi-size line over time.
This storyboard features two of the originals available (at top) and two new multi-size patterns-one for the 1928 frock with jabot (now 32" to 48" bust, with more sizes coming) and the re-worked 1938 McCall blouses. The blouses are now 32" to 48" bust also with more sizes coming. See last week's board for the silk matelasse sample of this blouse. It is marvelously detailed!

As well, you see the winner of the EvaDress Thrifty Thirties Pattern Challenge which closed the middle of this month. Milli did a wonderfully-fitting wool version of the 1933 Katharine Hepburn Ensemble from Butterick Starred Pattern 5156. She gets to shop $150 in EvaDress Patterns with the certificate she won!
As always, I appreciate everyone's participation in this winter challenge. I will post the projects in my online gallery shortly.
I have two challenges lined up for 2016, so stay tuned for details come this spring.

On another challenge note, EvaDress Patterns is sponsoring the Red Dress Contest at PatternReview.com. First place will be awarded a $100 non-expiring EvaDress Pattern gift certificate and the second place will receive a $50 certificate.

Sunday, January 17, 2016

Jan. 11 - Jan. 15, The week in Patterning - 4

First in this week's storyboard, 'new' vintage patterns arrived this week! They are from a generous customer going through a family member's life-long belongings. These are just two and note they (as are more from this collection) are in sizes ranging 38 to 44 bust. I will post more about the complete set of originals as I continue to check each one. So far, I am sure I will add each one of these to my multi-size line.
This storyboard also includes a step back to the late-1930's as I complete the revisions to this blouse pattern I originally issued in sizes 32 to 42 bust. In addition to revising this pattern, I am adding sizes 44 and 46 bust. It will be ready for release late this coming week! Below left, is a silk matelasse sample I sewed from this pattern with the short, pleated sleeve.

Also in week 1, I gave a finishing detail of the cotton bobbinet Vogue 1935 Tucked Blouse (worn over the low-backed 1932 slip). It is now complete with vintage 'West Germany' crystal buttons and all!

Thursday, January 14, 2016

Make it with Wool 2016 Wrap-Up

These are highlights of finishing touches on my 2016 Make it with Wool and the complete ensemble from the skirt, up (click images for much larger views)!

Due to the nature of the A-line wrap skirt pieces, I sewed all skirt seams in the directional manner. I obtained really good results when lining up the Pendleton woven pattern at the seams this way.

For the waistband, I 'floated' a length of petersham ribbon between the waistband and waistband facing per Susan Khalje's Build a Better Waistband. The article was printed in Threads Magazine issue #165 February/March, 2013. The image shows carefully sewing the waistband to the skirt without catching the petersham (basted in place) into the machine stitches.


I mentioned in my previous 2016 Make it with Wool post that I used Gail Patrice's Deni-fuse interfacing for the skirt facing with a highly satisfactory result. Here is a detail of the skirt drape:


First image below shows the completely stitched front panel of the corselet. I tipped the bottom end of each bone and slid the stitches down to cut and tip the top end of each bone to length. Afterward, I used needle and thread to secure the crochet stitches to each bone tip. Following photo details the crocheted 'V' channel being sewn into place (by leaving a yarn tail on the crocheted channel that is four times the length of each corselet edge).




Back view of the corselet with buttons and ribbon lacing in place:


I often enjoy using bound edges as a finish, so I couldn't pass up the opportunity on the grand, draping collar of this Vogue blouse! I used self-fabric to finish as such. Following photo shows one of the two mitered corners:




The complete ensemble as shot by Barbara Trainor Photography at the Arizona state final, Nov. 20, 2015!

Nearly forgot the cherry on top! I fashioned this wool 'Gabardinia' from blouse scrap as a little whimsy to wear in my hair. I am afraid it doesn't show up in the angle in which the event photo was made:

Sunday, January 10, 2016

Jan. 4 - Jan. 8, The week in Patterning - 3

I completed the 1860 waist from EvaDress/Barrington House Polonaise pattern.  I look forward to obtaining photos of me wearing it to Sharlot Hall Museum Living History program yesterday for you all to see! Look up the first week's post for the in-progress and intro to this project.
Also in week 1, I gave a finishing detail of the cotton bobbinet Vogue 1935 Tucked Blouse (worn over the low-backed 1932 slip). It is now complete with vintage 'West Germany' crystal buttons and all!
In more patterns to come shortly, I am ready to grade a 1929 Bust Reducer into multiple sizes! Here you see it below right (original size is 48" bust).
At lower left is a 'simple' French 1920 coat I am about to digitize and will make available in multi-size as well.

Friday, January 1, 2016

Dec. 28 – Jan. 1, The week in Patterning – 2

I have 7 yards of sheer cotton to use with last summer’s 1869 bustle dress pattern.
I stretched it out from my studio into the kitchen where my pair of rabbits were playing for the day. This meant I had inadvertently created a bunny runway when I thought I was quickly assessing how the pattern would take the plaid!

The studies at lower right are options I am throwing around depending on how much of the sheer I have for such a finish. Part of this week's patterning has been to digitize, print and revise the pieces as well as add seam allowances to each and create cutting layout diagrams for them. The option at top is the basque originally prescribed as part of the bustle dress ensemble, yet the two below are offered as separate, more formal finishes. I will offer them as such once they are in multiple sizes.

Lastly, I managed to uncover yet another 'Hidden Gem'. I began issuing those patterns that somehow slipped through the cracks over the years, or needed a little something to complete it. Not sure how I overlooked this one as I went through some possibilities in '15, so it will be up in the next day!